The future requires innovators and revolutionaries

The future requires innovators and revolutionaries
We are all turning around the same set of issues: how can we anticipate the future?


It’s been a big week for NCUB. We started on Monday with an intellectually challenging annual lecture, delivered by Sir Andrew Witty, on the nature of technological excellence, industrial competitive edge, and the role of business-universities collaboration in driving both. The following morning we drew together senior business leaders and academics to reflect on leadership - how to develop more people like Sir Andrew.

I left that meeting to attend a session with Tony Hall, director general of the BBC, discussing the challenge of bringing on the right talent to meet the needs of the content and broadcast industries. As I was sitting in that meeting, the Future of Innovation in Television Technology Task Force, which I chair, sent out its third update in which all of the experts we gathered together made a plea that we focus on delivering future engineering and software talent for the TV sector.

We are all turning around the same set of issues: how can we anticipate the future? How can we prepare the ground for whatever comes next? We must continue to collaborate on new approaches to sharing information about the jobs and careers will be created in an evolving economy, knowing that are we all operating with imperfect information.

In the converged creative, digital and IT industries we are a bit obsessed about fused employees who can combine arts and science, either in themselves or by managing multidisciplinary teams. New roles constantly emerge as the internet crashes through business models with abandon. Who knew the TV and film industries would need data wranglers?

We cannot deliver the innovation revolution Sir Andrew calls for without innovation revolutionaries. These are the leaders of the future that we need to create.


Dr David Docherty is chief executive of NCUB

Expand for more