Reducing non-domestic waste water bills and lowering flood risk

Reducing non-domestic waste water bills and lowering flood risk

Dynamic Flow Technologies Limited (DFTL) design and manufacture innovative wastewater meters.

The company has been a member of Loughborough University’s innovation community since 2010, and is now based in the Advanced Technology Innovation Centre which opened in October 2015.

The location has helped the company to forge valuable partnerships with Loughborough researchers – Dr Rob Edwards and Prof Andrew Wheatley – and provided access to the R&D facilities within the School of Civil and Building Engineering.

Over the years, the company has attracted funding from Innovate UK (formerly the Technology Strategy Board) and the utilities sector, including Smart R&D grants to support proof of concept and prototype development work.

DFTL’s WasteWater Meter (WWM) is now being trialled by Wessex Water, Anglian Water and Thames Water. Elster Water Metering (now part of Honeywell) – a world leader in water metering – has helped to validate and mature the technology.

A WWM fitted to a commercial laundry in Bristol has demonstrated how the company can save more than 20% on its sewage bill. From April 2017, when the Government’s Open Water programme deregulates the UK water sector, many non-domestic customers will benefit from the new Ofwat tariffs by measuring their sewage outfalls.

The WWM also signals pipe blockages, providing early warning against flooding and spillages. Longer term, metering customers for surface water could encourage less flow in combined sewer systems, reducing flooding incidents and CSO spill frequencies.

In 2014, DFTL began a four-year sponsorship of an Engineering Doctorate in the Centre for Innovative and Collaborative Construction Engineering in its prestigious (EngD) programme.

“This further strengthens our commitment to working closely with Loughborough University,” said DFTL Managing Director, Martin Croft. “We are also looking to enhance the technology further to measure flows in open channels and rivers, as well as quality sensing.”

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