Global Graduates

Global Graduates

NCUB has brought together a group of senior leaders from higher education and business to build on the Global Graduates into Global Leaders research undertaken by the Council for Industry and Higher Education (Now NCUB), the Association of Graduate Recruiters, and research agency CFE in 2011.

Today's university leavers are competing for jobs with graduates from across the world. There is a highly mobile graduate workforce and employers are eager to recruit the very best.

Currently global mobility among UK students is low, lagging badly behind our international competitors. This is bad news for the UK. The so-called 'headquarters effect' suggests that business leaders hold a stronger emotional attachment to their own country. It implies that such people, leading multi-national companies, are more likely to support the operations in their home-countries than elsewhere. Ensuring more global business leaders are UK citizens should be a strategic priority for the country.

NCUB are currently working on the next stage of the Global Graduates programme. This involves working with universities and businesses to develop ways in which the skills needed for global employability can be embedded into students’ learning experience, and how businesses can seek to attract global talent.

Global Graduates on ncub.co.uk

BLOG: The importance of International experience

REPORT: Global Graduates into Global Leaders

REPORT: Global Graduates into Global Leaders: Executive Summary

BLOG: Developing global graduates for a global economy

NCUB are currently working on the next stage of the Global Graduates programme. This invovles  working with universities and businesses to develop ways in which the skills needed for global employability can be embedded into students’ learning experience, and how businesses can seek to attract global talent.

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